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Ramblings of history, science, and culture

Friday, June 13, 2003


I just listened to Science Friday energy policy issue. [ http://www.sciencefriday.com/ ]

What things should be the foundation of a national energy policy? I say radiant energy and solar power. Members of Congress is pushing through a major energy bill ... it's hydra of horrors, containing provisions for ethanol to expanded nuclear power plant funding.

I'm for developing any viable source of energy which is better for our enviroment than that which we are now using. The best thing would be to investigate the physics behind the space tethers [see link below]. Similar devices could be constructed on this planet to make Earth Tethers. The alternate current technology it's based off of is old though [nearly 100yrs].

http://www.spacetransportation.com/news/Tether_propulsion.pdf

Wednesday, June 11, 2003

The Case of Problems

After reading this article ...
http://www.alternet.org/story.html?StoryID=16142
... I have felt impelled to write this article.

John Dean has got a serious problem. Mr. Dean, it appears to this writer, didn't like the authorization of the use of American military forces in Iraq. He and I have problems with the missing WMDs. It is clear that he is very frustrated with the current situation. I am too, but for very different reasons.

Should Mr. Dean believe the President of the United States? He says he was holding a benefit of doubt. Signs, though, do not look good. He doubts the Iraqi informants thought to be reliable. He doubts the satellite photos. He doubts the evidence. The gap between reality and Mr. Dean's doubts only increases his sense that the President's misstatements may actually have been intentional lies. It sorely noted that Mr. Dean dismisses the the core reason for the war [i.e., the weapons of mass destruction], and refers to reasons such as misrepresented intelligence, 'Iraq swims in a sea of oil', and public manipulations.

Does Mr. Dean doubt that Iraq was expanding and improving facilities that were used for the production of biological weapons or that Iraq had stockpiled biological and chemical weapons, and was rebuilding the facilities used to make more of those weapons? Does Mr. Dean doubt that Iraq was seeking nuclear weapons? Does he doubt the old Iraqi regime had produced thousands of tons of chemical agents, including mustard gas, sarin nerve gas, VX nerve gas? Does he deny the evidence that indicated Iraq was reconstituting its nuclear weapons program? Does Mr. Dean doubt Saddam Hussein held numerous meetings with Iraqi nuclear scientists, the infamous "nuclear mujahideen"? Does he doubt that the Iraq regime continued to possess and conceal some of the most lethal weapons ever devised?

Mabey. Probably. It's highly discouraging to this writer that Mr. Dean views statements of the President to be false [or, in the least, questionable].

The Bush's White House has not swept issues under the carpet. The issues are not out of sight, as can plainly be seen in recent articles and news reports that focus on the question of what happened to Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction (WMDs). The questions surrounding the Iraqi war are being answered currently. It is too early to draw conclusions though it's not early enough for Mr. Dean to doubt all of this. It does seem though that Mr. Dean hopes the WMDs are found, for it will end his doubts [atleast on this issue].

Where are the WMDs?

Currently, no WMDs have been found. American military special forces searched too late for weapons of mass destruction.. Operation Freedom's penetration of Iraq and drive toward Baghdad was too late in finding the WMDs. The coalition forces gained control of Iraqi cities and countryside too late to find the WMDs. Special search teams were dispatched too late to look for WMDs. The past two and a half months were too late for military patrols to visit the suspected WMD sites throughout Iraq. The Pentagon is still searching for WMD sites. They will be looking for people who can provide information where the missing WMDs might be. None of the prohibited weapons have been found, it probably has been too late.

Saddam may have ordered the WMDs destroyed. Fearing to be taken out, Saddam covered his tracks and obscured his activities. Worst of all possibilities, the WMDs may have been taken out of Iraq. Proliferation of weapons of mass destruction due to inaction. They could be in the hands of dozens of groups.

The WMDs will be very hard to find for the delay in acting on the matter was huge and let the old Iraqi regime hide or remove them. The large quantities, "thousands of tons" of chemical weapons, may have easily be hidden or dispatched to the rogue's allies.

The lag in acting on this danger may have allowed the telltale facilities, the groups of scientists who could testify, and production equipment to be destroyed, silence, and/or removed.

How can the doubt that they may not have existed be removed, when there was plenty of time for the WMDs to be obscured?

There are a few possibilities. The Bush White House's national security operations should be more decisive. That seems difficult, as the doubters will continue to stonewall any action. The other is that the President must lead the nation, and the world, more forcefully. America has entered a new age of pre-emption when it must strike first because it cannot afford to find out later if terrorists possess nuclear or biological weapons.

Bush Administration has not intentionally manipulated public nor has there been misrepresented intelligence to get Congress to authorize military action. Saddam posed an imminent threat. Now that threat has gone underground due to inaction. Congress and the public should support more of President Bush's decisive solutions to rogue nations and terrorist groups [or as Mr. Dean likes calling "warmaking"]. The war in Iraq is all Bush's doing. His administration has tried to take out one of the many rogues that threaten peace and security in this modern day. The doubters, through inaction, may have cost all of us a bit of this security. That is my, and your, problem.

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